Steam ID : irrhythmic

Hi, I'm Sev. I'm a 23-year-old trans ftm-ish agender white able-bodied dyadic mood-disordered probably-ADHD Canadian currently-unemployed atheist and I recently received a BA in Linguistics for some unfathomable reason. I am a "they," or a "ze," or whatever that's not "she," really.

This blog is heavy in the content you may call "social justice," which I try to tag appropriately (along with other things).

I spend a lot of time reblogging cute animals, soothing landscapes, and fan meta (HP, LOTR, Hannibal, Doctor Who, Supernatural, Avengers, Community, Adventure Time, Team Fortress 2, Pokémon, Portal, Minecraft, Skyrim, lots of other stuff).

This blog may also occasionally contain original content, probably me whining. I have dedicated blogs for conlanging, "art," and my conworld project Towers.

je parle français / hablo español
learning ASL

Feel free to contact me by any means, at any time, for any reason. I am here and I am listening.

currently tinkering with my theme and some things don't work too well yet!
The Virž alphabet (along with the symbols I use to represent each phonetic characterwhile typing: refer to this post for pronunciation) is written in cursive and looks superficially similar to Arabic, but the letterforms are (mostly) quite different, and it is written left-to-right. 
In each column you see three different versions of the same letter - they indicate the position the letter is in the word; beginning, middle, or end. The letters for <t> and <d> change line height depending on what they come after.
Trailing-off dots indicate connections to other letters.
The small circles shown as part of each letter are usually written as simple dots and indicate one of three things: for vowels (column 1), a dot means nasalization; for obstruent consonants (column 2 and s/z at the bottom of column 3), a dot indicates a voiced sound; and for sonorant consonants (column 3 save s/z) the dot shows that the letter is syllabic. 
The symbols for <u> and <i> are also used for [w] and [j] (English <y>) when placed before another vowel. To write a word like “freeing”, where the [i] comes before another vowel, Virž writers merely write <i> twice (transliteration would be friiïq).

The Virž alphabet (along with the symbols I use to represent each phonetic characterwhile typing: refer to this post for pronunciation) is written in cursive and looks superficially similar to Arabic, but the letterforms are (mostly) quite different, and it is written left-to-right. 

In each column you see three different versions of the same letter - they indicate the position the letter is in the word; beginning, middle, or end. The letters for <t> and <d> change line height depending on what they come after.

Trailing-off dots indicate connections to other letters.

The small circles shown as part of each letter are usually written as simple dots and indicate one of three things: for vowels (column 1), a dot means nasalization; for obstruent consonants (column 2 and s/z at the bottom of column 3), a dot indicates a voiced sound; and for sonorant consonants (column 3 save s/z) the dot shows that the letter is syllabic. 

The symbols for <u> and <i> are also used for [w] and [j] (English <y>) when placed before another vowel. To write a word like “freeing”, where the [i] comes before another vowel, Virž writers merely write <i> twice (transliteration would be friiïq).

Posted: Sun July 10th, 2011 at 3:21am
HighRes: view
Tagged: virž conlang constructed language alphabet cursive
Notes: 11
  1. halonia reblogged this from pumpkinskull
  2. fyeahconlangs reblogged this from pumpkinskull
  3. gentleness-evident said: You should make this into a font. I have no idea how fonts are made but it would be really cool.
  4. invinciblend said: That is *beautiful*! I love this style of writing, and it’s hard to pull off a) attractively, b) usefully, and c) without looking like a ripoff of Arabic (in my experience making & finding at least). Love it :D
  5. pumpkinskull posted this